C h a z z W r i t e s . c o m

Write and publish with love and fury.

Write! Like a Boss!

One of the movies we love here in the secret bunker is The Incredibles. I love a good Bond movie and The Incredibles is superheroes in a Bond movie. It’s a lot of fun, though, for me, the most effecting scene is where the missiles close on the plane with kids on board. Having kids makes you cry easily and I’ve cried during that scene several times over.

Kind of a Spoiler

In the original plot for The Incredibles, the plot called for the plane to be piloted by an ordinary human — a sweet old man and friend of Elastigirl — who gets killed in the explosion. That was revised when they decided it was too dark a turn for a kids’ movie.

The best scene

For my wife, She Who Must Be Obeyed, the scene she always brings up first is the attack on the city.

Samuel L. Jackson, primed to defend innocents and come out of retirement, really sells it when he sees the devastation and shouts, “Honey! Where is my super suit?!” 

His wife’s reply: “Oh, no you don’t! I have been planning this dinner with the Robinsons for weeks!”

Honey! Where is my super suit?!” 

The juxtaposition of the mundane with a superhero’s clothing needs is funny, but it doesn’t stand out as much for me. She Who Must Be Obeyed is not wrong. (That can never happen.) However, it underlines that we can’t predict how our writing will be received. We must write for ourselves and hope others of like mind will find us (or we must find them). When I wrote for magazines, I was often surprised which bit of a column provoked outrage and what spurred letters of admiration. People won’t necessarily unpack your book the way you thought you sent it.

And then… 

Yesterday I read one-star reviews of a few of Shakespeare’s plays. One star. Really? I know it’s a subjective universe, but The Freakin’ Bard only gets one star? 

Write more. Worry less.

You could concern yourself with the trend of reviews. Report the abusive reviews. Consider correcting fallacies in reviews (like author Elle Lothlorien). Refuse to read your reviews (like author JA Konrath).

Reviewers are not your boss. You are your boss. Being boss is one of your best reasons to write. Don’t give it up. Write! Like a boss!

Stop worrying so much and just write your next best thing. The next best thing could be your best book ever (which someone will load down with a one-star review). Just write. Not everyone will love your book or they’ll love different parts of your book for different reasons. Those who dislike your work aren’t your readers of the future, so they don’t matter. They don’t pay you for your books so they literally don’t figure into the accounting. 

There really is no accounting for taste.

~ Robert Chazz Chute writes like a boss. Check out his books at AllThatChazz.com (where he also podcasts like a boss.) He interviews like a boss at CoolPeoplePodcast.com. He loses weight like a boss at DecisionToChange.com. He vines like a boss and writes about Vine here. He prepares an apocalypse like a ghoulish boss full of verisimilitude and magic realism at ThisPlagueOfDays.com.

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Filed under: Rejection, reviews, Writers, writing tips, , , , , , , ,

11 Responses

  1. I think if everyone likes your writing, not enough people are reading it.

  2. And I read that line about the super suit hearing Samuel L. Jackson’s voice. That was so funny.

    I’m in the don’t-read-reviews camp these days. I stopped monitoring Google Alerts to catch every mention of my books and started focusing on writing the next one. Did a world of good for my state of zen, and my acne cleared up.

    • Chazz says:

      Your acne cleared up? That’s a strong recommendation. I’ll meet you halfway and only read the good ones. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  3. Jams N. Roses says:

    I think you’re spot on with this article.

    If people aren’t liking your work, then it’s the wrong people reading it.

    • Chazz says:

      Well, I’m personally universally loved, but yes, when someone goes contrarian, I’ll try to remember not to feel too bad. (Note to self: Figure out how not to feel bad.)

  4. Jeff Currie says:

    Thanks,you have perfect timing! Enjoyed the post. ( Love the Incredibles, by the way 🙂 Reblogged at jdcurrie.com (Off the Beaten Track)

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