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Writing: The Rule of Three & the peril of semi-colons

Massey Hall, Toronto

Image via Wikipedia

Saturday night I saw Bill Maher at Massey Hall in Toronto. Good show, fun time. Bill is known for Real time with Bill Maher, his documentary Religulous, his comedy and his New Rules books. Watching him perform, I noticed he never breaks the Rule of Three. It is a good rule, an effective rule and a memorable rule that I just demonstrated with this very sentence.

Wikipedia puts it like this: The “Rule of Three” is a principle in writing that suggests that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things.”

Of course, you will write longer lists, but when you use a colon, do so sparingly unless you’re composing a scientific paper. Semi-colons can be very useful in separating elements in a list after a colon. However, if you use the semi-colon to separate related clauses, please do so sparingly. Wikipedia says, “According to the British writer on grammar, Lynne Truss, many non writers avoid the colon and semicolon…”

I disagree. It’s not just non-writers who avoid the semi-colon to separate interdependent clauses. 

The semi-colon can be a useful device occasionally, but as a punctuation mark, it is often either misused or has fallen out of favor.

When Lynne Truss refers to “non-writers”, does she not also mean people who are readers? Shouldn’t it be the common reader who sets the standard for what’s easily read and understood? I invoke the common usage rule here. When something has fallen out of common use, it’s too rusty to use without a lot of irritating squeaking. For instance, if a writer uses the word “behooves,” he sounds like he’s trying to be Charles Dickens. You just aren’t old enough for that.

Similarly, the semi-colon has fallen so far out of common use that when a reader encounters one, it pulls them out of the narrative to think, “Hey, look! A semi-colon! Why did the author feel it was necessary to separate related thoughts with a semi-colon, instead of separating those ideas with a simple period? Anything that stops me from breezing along through a novel is a speed bump that I would prefer shaved down so I can speed along and focus on content instead of transmission static.

I have never read a sentence with a semi-colon that I did not reread at least twice.

I’m not saying  you shouldn’t use semi-colons, if they suit you; I am saying, I won’t use the semi-colon.

Anymore.

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Filed under: Editing, Editors, grammar, , , , , , , , , , ,

5 Responses

  1. Sorry – I have a love affair with the semi-colon.
    And – you may have noticed – the hyphen.
    The odd “…” sneaks in as well….

  2. Chazz says:

    I accept you. i forgive you. 🙂

    And I understand. My love affair is with the em dash.

  3. Reena Jacobs says:

    Interesting observation. I use semi-colons, sparingly. Sometimes two sentences seem so closely related, a period seems a bit much. When I hit two independent clauses and think, “I sure wish I could use a comma instead of a period here, but it’d be grammatically incorrect,” I opt for the semi-colon.

    On the other hand, I can see the point. You never want to pull a reader out of the story. Whether I like it or not, I know a semi-colon can pull a lot of readers out of the story. I find myself assessing the use of a semi-colon when I come across one. Was it needed? Why did the author use it here? Okay, I can MAYBE see the use of a semi-colon here.

  4. […] Writing: The Rule of Three & the peril of semi-colons (chazzwrites.wordpress.com) […]

  5. […] Writing: The Rule of Three & the peril of semi-colons (chazzwrites.wordpress.com) Like this:LikeBe the first to like this post. […]

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